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The Macaronic technique in the English language in texts from the Old English, medieval and early modern periods (9th to 18th centuries): a collection and discussion

Boehme, Julia (2011) The Macaronic technique in the English language in texts from the Old English, medieval and early modern periods (9th to 18th centuries): a collection and discussion. MRes thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

Macaronics have traditionally been regarded either as a genre with origins in fifteenth-century Italy or as an umbrella-term for any kind of language-mixing. In the context of Latin-English macaronics, from earliest extant material (9th c.) to sustained cultivation until about 1800, this paper investigates both peripheries. Intended as both a select catalogue of specimens and investigation into their technical applications, attention is given to a wide range of issues, including syntactical functions, manuscript context, social issues pertaining to linguistic, historic and political strata, relative status of the involved languages, questions of linguistic and textual authority, stylistic effect and linguistic competence. Extended quotation from the textual data will further aim to ensure continued traceability of some specimens which are on the verge of being lost. The study shows the individual treatment of macaronics in the English language as facilitated by the ambiguities of the term itself.

Item Type: Thesis (MRes)
Qualification Level: Masters
Keywords: macaronics, code-switching, language-mixing, Latin, Piers Plowman
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PE English
P Language and Literature > P Philology. Linguistics
Colleges/Schools: College of Arts > School of Humanities > Classics
Supervisor's Name: Panayotakis, Dr. Costas
Date of Award: 2011
Depositing User: Ms Julia Boehme
Unique ID: glathesis:2011-3550
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 08 Nov 2012
Last Modified: 10 Dec 2012 14:08
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/3550

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