Improved diagnostics for sleeping sickness

Kremer, Clemens (2013) Improved diagnostics for sleeping sickness. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

The aim of this work was to explore an alternative to existing methods of detection for Human African Trypanosomiasis (also known as sleeping sickness). A new approach to diagnostics for sleeping sickness is needed, since the existing methods of detection employed in the field have significant shortcomings in terms of sensitivity, cost or ease of operation. In this work, the enrichment of trypanosomes from blood using travelling electric fields and the selective lysis of cells using optoelectronic tweezers will be presented. Both techniques allow for the enrichment of trypanosomes from blood samples but the first is more suited for an application as a point-of-care device, while the latter is also applicable to other cell types and offers greater flexibility. Besides demonstrating and quantifying the experimental results the work includes simulations to further explain the phenomena and investigate the underlying mechanisms. The results presented here offer a new method to enrich trypanosomes, a central step in any potential diagnostic tool. They open up the possibility to develop a new solution to the challenges posed by sleeping sickness diagnostics and allow for miniaturisation and automation of the process.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Keywords: Diagnostics, DEP, Microfluidic, Sleeping Sickness, Lysis, Lab-on-a-Chip
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Q Science > QC Physics
T Technology > TK Electrical engineering. Electronics Nuclear engineering
Colleges/Schools: College of Science and Engineering > School of Engineering > Biomedical Engineering
Funder's Name: UNSPECIFIED
Supervisor's Name: Cooper, Prof. Jon and Barrett, Prof. Michael
Date of Award: 2013
Depositing User: clemens kremer
Unique ID: glathesis:2013-4822
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 19 Feb 2014 09:55
Last Modified: 19 Feb 2014 10:11
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/4822

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