From local constraints to global binocular motion perception

Heron, S (2014) From local constraints to global binocular motion perception. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

Humans and many other predators have two eyes that are set a short distance apart so that an extensive region of the world is seen simultaneously by both eyes from slightly different points of view. Although the images of the world are essentially two-dimensional, we vividly see the world as three-dimensional. This is true for static as well as dynamic images. We discuss local constraints for the perception of three-dimensional binocular motion in a geometric-probabilistic framework. It is shown that Bayesian models of binocular 3D motion can explain perceptual bias under uncertainty and predict perceived velocity under ambiguity. The models exploit biologically plausible constraints of local motion and disparity processing in a binocular viewing geometry. Results from psychophysical experiments and an fMRI study support the idea that local constraints of motion and disparity processing are combined late in the visual processing hierarchy to establish perceived 3D motion direction. The methods and results reported here are likely to stimulate computational, psychophysical, and neuroscientific research because they address the fundamental issue of how 3D motion is represented in the human visual system.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Keywords: Stereomotion, Binocular, Motion-in-depth
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Q Science > QC Physics
Q Science > QP Physiology
Colleges/Schools: College of Science and Engineering > School of Psychology
Funder's Name: UNSPECIFIED
Supervisor's Name: Lages, Dr Martin
Date of Award: 2014
Depositing User: Miss Suzanne Heron
Unique ID: glathesis:2014-5218
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 27 Jun 2014 10:43
Last Modified: 27 Jun 2014 10:44
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/5218

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