Experimental arrangements suitable for evaluating heterogeneous catalysts for phosgene formation

Rossi, Giovanni E. (2014) Experimental arrangements suitable for evaluating heterogeneous catalysts for phosgene formation. MSc(R) thesis, University of Glasgow.

Due to Embargo and/or Third Party Copyright restrictions, this thesis is not available in this service.

Abstract

The design and construction of two experimental platforms for the testing of heterogeneous catalysts are described. The first is intended for a vapour phase dimerisation process over a solid catalyst. Issues connected with refinement of that experimental arrangement are described and an operational specification defined. No catalyst testing is reported for this arrangement. The second apparatus is designed to explore carbonyl chloride (phosgene) synthesis from the reaction of CO and Cl2 over high surface area carbon catalysts. After the experimental configuration of the phosgene test facility has been described, a series of reaction test data using a Donau Supersorbon K40 catalyst is presented. Steady state phosgene production was established and is associated with an activation energy of 28 kJ mol-1. Van’t Hoff plots were adopted to obtain the rate law for this reaction and a reaction scheme is proposed. Overall this study is intended to provide training in the design, construction and testing of heterogeneous catalyst test apparatus. Further, the phosgene synthesis measurements are intended to provide insight into an important application of process chemistry relevant to an isocyanate production chain.

Item Type: Thesis (MSc(R))
Qualification Level: Masters
Additional Information: Due to copyright restrictions the full text of this thesis cannot be made available online. Access to the printed version is available.
Subjects: Q Science > QD Chemistry
Colleges/Schools: College of Science and Engineering > School of Chemistry
Funder's Name: UNSPECIFIED
Supervisor's Name: Lennon, Dr. David
Date of Award: 2014
Depositing User: Mr Giovanni Rossi
Unique ID: glathesis:2014-5363
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 29 Jul 2014 12:32
Last Modified: 18 Jul 2017 12:32
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/5363

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