Plasmonic enhanced pyroelectrics for microfluidic manipulation

Esan, Olurotimi (2017) Plasmonic enhanced pyroelectrics for microfluidic manipulation. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

Plasmon enhanced micromanipulation addresses some of the drawbacks associated with more traditional optical based methods, particularly in regard to the nature of laser excitation required for actuation. The resonant electromagnetic field enhancement observed as a result of the plasmon resonance phenomenon, enables trapping of nanoscale objects, and reduces the risk of photoinduced sample damage by reducing excitation power required for trapping. Plasmon resonance introduces an unavoidable heating effect which hinders stable trapping in microfluidic environments as a result of phenomena such as convection. In this work, the heating associated with plasmon resonance is used constructively, to devise a new micromanipulation technique. Plasmonic nanostructures are patterned on pyroelectric substrates which create an electric field in response to changes in temperature. This electric field results in the generation of local and global electrokinetic phenomena which are used in high throughput trapping of suspended particles. To demonstrate the versatility of this technique, particles are patterned into arbitrary shapes. A suggested application for this technique is as an optically controlled photoresist free lithographic method for use in microfluidic environments.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Keywords: electrokinetics, microfluidics, plasmonic heating, pyroelectric manipulation.
Subjects: T Technology > T Technology (General)
Colleges/Schools: College of Science and Engineering > School of Engineering > Biomedical Engineering
Funder's Name: UNSPECIFIED
Supervisor's Name: Cooper, Professor Jonathan
Date of Award: 2017
Depositing User: Mr O Esan
Unique ID: glathesis:2017-8274
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 12 Jun 2017 14:35
Last Modified: 18 Jul 2017 12:52
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/8274

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