Prospective memory and social functioning in psychosis

Newton, Sarah (2011) Prospective memory and social functioning in psychosis. MSc(R) thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

Research on prospective memory (PM) has increased rapidly in recent years. However, the impact of deficits in PM on everyday functioning and in particular, social identity and functioning (SF), is less well explored, particularly in people who are experiencing, or have recently experienced, their first episode of psychosis (FEP). In this study fifteen people attending a service for first episode psychosis were compared with twenty four attending the same youth enquiry service for other reasons. Their performance was assessed on measures of cognition, prospective memory and social identity and functioning. While the psychosis group were compromised in their retrospective memory and executive function they were similar to the comparison group in their demographics, general cognitive abilities, PM and SF. The possibility that both groups were compromised in relation to PM was raised through reference to normative data for the measures used. The results suggest that further research on the relationship between PM and SF is important for the advancement of psychosocial interventions with people who have experienced their first episode of psychosis.

Item Type: Thesis (MSc(R))
Qualification Level: Masters
Keywords: prospective memory, social functioning, identity, psychosis
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Colleges/Schools: College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences
Funder's Name: UNSPECIFIED
Supervisor's Name: Evans, Professor Jonathan
Date of Award: 2011
Depositing User: Dr Sarah Newton
Unique ID: glathesis:2011-3016
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 18 Mar 2013 16:09
Last Modified: 18 Mar 2013 16:12
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/3016

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