Glasgow Theses Service

Is errorless learning an effective strategy for a procedural memory task?

Donaghey, Claire L. (2008) Is errorless learning an effective strategy for a procedural memory task? D Clin Psy thesis, University of Glasgow.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF
Download (936kB) | Preview

Abstract

Errorless learning has been demonstrated to be an effective strategy for the cognitive rehabilitation of people with memory impairment. This study aimed to determine whether errorless learning is an effective strategy for teaching a complex procedure. Cognitive impairment has been tentatively linked with outcome after rehabilitation for lower limb amputation. Addressing this impairment may improve outcome. The aim of this study was to determine whether using an errorless learning approach would be beneficial for individuals who are learning how to put on their prosthetic limb. Thirty participants from a prosthetic clinic (WestMARC) were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 15) or control group (n = 15). Results suggest that errorless learning is beneficial in terms of increasing the number of correct steps recalled from a fitting sequence (Mann-Whitney U = 28; p = 0.000, 2-tailed) compared to the control group. In addition, the errorless learning group made fewer errors during the fitting sequence compared to the control group (Mann-Whitney U = 39; p = 0.002, 2-tailed). The findings suggest that errorless learning is a beneficial approach to use when individuals are learning a procedural memory task.

Item Type: Thesis (D Clin Psy)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Keywords: Errorless Learning, Cognitive Rehabilitation, Prosthetic Rehabilitation, Skill Learning
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Colleges/Schools: College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing
Supervisor's Name: McMillan, Professor Tom M.
Date of Award: 2008
Depositing User: Miss Claire L Donaghey
Unique ID: glathesis:2008-402
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 16 Oct 2009
Last Modified: 10 Dec 2012 13:18
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/402

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item