A study of the impact of stroke comorbidities on the dynamic cortical collateral perfusion following acute ischaemic stroke

Biose, Ifechukwude Joachim (2018) A study of the impact of stroke comorbidities on the dynamic cortical collateral perfusion following acute ischaemic stroke. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.

Due to Embargo and/or Third Party Copyright restrictions, this thesis is not available in this service.
Printed Thesis Information: https://eleanor.lib.gla.ac.uk/record=b3331213

Abstract

Acute hyperglycaemia and chronic hypertension are known risk factors of stroke and are often present following ischaemic stroke onset. These stroke comorbidities worsen neurological outcome following stroke in humans and accelerates the growth of cerebral ischaemic lesion in experimental models. Recent evidence indicates that the functional capacity of cerebral collateral vessels is critical for the survival of the ischaemic penumbral before and following the administration of available endovascular therapies. However, the influence of stroke comorbidities on cerebral collateral flow dynamics following stroke is not well understood. Therefore, the studies detailed in this thesis aimed to determine the impact of acute post-stroke hyperglycaemia and chronic hypertension on the dynamic recruitment of cortical collateral perfusion following focal cerebral ischaemia. In addition, the efficacy of a potent vasodilator was evaluated for its potential flow enhancing properties following ischaemic stroke in the presence of chronic hypertension.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Colleges/Schools: College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Supervisor's Name: McCabe, Dr. Christopher and Macrae, Prof. Mhairi
Date of Award: 2018
Embargo Date: 9 January 2022
Depositing User: Mrs Marie Cairney
Unique ID: glathesis:2018-40912
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 09 Jan 2019 09:06
Last Modified: 10 Jan 2019 08:48
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/40912

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