The role of public sector reforms in consumer protection : China and the UK

Liu, Liqing (2001) The role of public sector reforms in consumer protection : China and the UK. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

Recent managerial and organisational changes through the new public management, organisational restructuring and consumerism are studied from the backgrounds of each country, for example, the significance, peculiarity and influence of public sector reforms in the UK or in China or elsewhere. Fewer articles have centred on a comparative perspective in public sector reforms, which have occurred recently in both the UK and China. The aim of this study was to provide readers with a better understanding of the major thrusts of administrative reforms, how they have affected those managing the services, and their restructuring, and how public sector reform ideas have integrated with the practice of public sector reforms. A comparative legal method was employed by which these changes were investigated and studied theoretically and practically, with a wide range of studies from government documents, both published openly and internally, a literature search from academic sources and interviews. The results indicated that similar objectives, namely streamlining governmental institutions, raising efficiency and effectiveness in administrative management, and the primacy of consumers, are pursued in both China and the UK although the developments varied in degree and scope. These findings suggest that a comparative approach might be the most suitable in seeking to provide an interpretative rationale rather than a purely abstract analysis of administrative reform agenda. No one should accept the ready-made blueprints of public sector reforms without considering their own economic circumstances, social culture and political manifesto.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Subjects: K Law > K Law (General)
Colleges/Schools: College of Social Sciences > School of Law
Funder's Name: UNSPECIFIED
Supervisor's Name: Prosser, Prof. T.
Date of Award: 2001
Depositing User: Mrs Marie Cairney
Unique ID: glathesis:2001-4242
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 02 May 2013 15:00
Last Modified: 02 May 2013 15:02
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/4242

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