The development and evaluation of a patient workstation

Al-Barwani, Fatima A.M. (1997) The development and evaluation of a patient workstation. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

The objectives of this study were primarily to investigate the design and the use of a patient workstation in a gastro-enterology clinic. In particular, to investigate a more interactive form of patient-computer interviewing by combining computer interrogation of the patient with patient interrogation of the computer. The main question that this study addressed was whether or not patients should be offered more 'freedom' in their interaction with the computer such that they could stop or 'interrupt' the computer interview to find out more information. A subordinate question to the main question was whether or not, within the combined system, a 'tailored' or an adaptive type of information provision is 'better' than a more general type. A patient workstation was developed and evaluated to combine computer interrogation of the patient and patient interrogation of the computer. A new version of the existing GLAsgow diagnostic system for DYSpepsia-GLADYS was developed. This version allowed the combination of the 'pure' interviewing system GLADYS and an interactive health information system focused on the health needs of dyspeptic patients. Evaluation studies compared three situations for the system, where patients were automatically randomised to use on the of the three styles. (1) Style A: Computer interview or interrogation of the patient followed by patient interrogation of the computer, where the patient can seek general health information in gastro-enterology after the computer interview. (2) Style B: Same as style A but allows the patients to interrupt the computer interview to seek health information in gastro-enterology. (3) Style C: half of the patients from style B were presented with a selected range of information in gastro-enterology adapted to some degree to their own characteristics and to their interview responses.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Colleges/Schools: College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Funder's Name: UNSPECIFIED
Supervisor's Name: Jones, Dr. Ray and Cawsey, Dr. Alison and Knill-Jones, Dr. Robin
Date of Award: 1997
Embargo Date: 1997
Depositing User: Ms Anikó Szilágyi
Unique ID: glathesis:1997-5906
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 12 Jan 2015 12:22
Last Modified: 12 Jan 2015 12:32
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/5906

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