Understanding Biblical inspiration as a written response to symbolically-mediated revelation; A hermeneutically-aware model which can inform the reading of the Bible within the Church

Hill, Robert James (2005) Understanding Biblical inspiration as a written response to symbolically-mediated revelation; A hermeneutically-aware model which can inform the reading of the Bible within the Church. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

This study offers a model for a hermeneutically aware contemporary understanding of Biblical Inspiration, as the Spirit-animated response to symbolic Revelation. It is supported by Biblical scholarship and philosophical hermeneutics; its compatibility with doctrinal requirements of the Catholic Church is also demonstrated. Chapter 1 surveys sources traditionally called upon to defend Inspiration; New Testament passages, and official church statements. A critique of these highlights what they actually tell us about Inspiration. Chapter 2 evaluates past and recent theories of Inspiration, and critiques the traditional Principle of Instrumental Efficient Causality. It also considers opinions of scholars, from Lagrange to Hoffmann, to provide a basis for this particular model. Chapter 3 outlines the model, assessing the contribution of the symbol for a theory of Revelation which accompanies the model of Inspiration given here. Tillich, Fawcett, Polanyi, Wheelwright, Dulles and Ricoeur are among scholars whose insights are called upon. Ricoeur provides the necessary philosophical hermeneutics for the validation of the model. Finally, Biblical evidence is sought for the contention that this model is identifiably at work in Scripture; Brueggemann and Westermann provide insights from some prophets and the psalms, which support the proposed model; they also, with Perrin, Crossan, and others, provide support from the New Testament. Chapter 4 explains how metaphor and myth can aid the interpretation of symbol in Scripture. Through Ricoeur's proposed five types of Revelatory Scriptural discourse, the chapter proposes that Ricoeur's model of Revelatory discourse is closer to what this study calls Inspiration. Chapter 5 shows the compatibility of the model for Inspiration with Catholic Magisterial pronouncements. Drawing from contemporary readings of Scripture by Mesters, Mabon, Dewey, Belo and Best, the study demonstrates that this model satisfies academic requirements and also is relevant for the person of faith's reading of Scripture, whether in the church of today, or the past, thereby providing theological underpinning for the Second Vatican Council's desire that the Bible be made available to the widest possible readership.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Additional Information: Advisers: John Riches; Julie Clague
Keywords: Biblical studies
Date of Award: 2005
Depositing User: Enlighten Team
Unique ID: glathesis:2005-72232
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 24 May 2019 15:12
Last Modified: 24 May 2019 15:12
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/72232

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