Prevalence of intestinal parasites in school children from two Mexican states after 7 years of albendazole administration

Cota, Luis Quihui (2001) Prevalence of intestinal parasites in school children from two Mexican states after 7 years of albendazole administration. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

A total of 1476 stool samples was collected from 492 school children aged 6-10 years old (240 females and 252 males) representing 41.5% of 1185 enrolled school children from 1 sub-urban and 11 rural communities of the States of Sinaloa (n=341) and Oaxaca (n=151). The school children from Sinaloa were found to be more susceptible to protozoan infections than helminth infections and children from Oaxaca are at the same risk to protozoan and helminth infections. The school children from Oaxaca are currently more affected by helminth infections than those from Sinaloa. Protozoan infections were found to be equally present in both States. The current prevalences of G. lamblia, E. coli, E. nana, I. bulschlii, T. trichiura, A. lumbricoides, E. vermicular is, and H. nana in school children continue to be similar with those found by Diaz et al. from 1987 to 1994 in the general population from different rural and sub-urban communities. The current prevalences of G. lamblia, E. coli, E. nana, and I. butschlii are currently higher in Oaxaca than those reported in the general population by Navarrete et al., (1993), Soriano, (1998), and LESPO (1999), although the prevalence of A. lumbricoides has shown an important decrease with time. Results showed no difference in the levels of intensities of H. nana, A. lumbricoides, and T. trichiura in the school children between Sinaloa and Oaxaca. Younger school children harboured higher eggs counts than older children from both States The gender of the school children had no influence on the prevalence of the intestinal parasitic infections in this study. The prevalence of protozoan infections showed a decrease with age but helminth infections remained low but stable in Sinaloa. The prevalence of protozoan and helminth infections showed different trends with age in Oaxaca. The number of family members was found not to be associated with the levels of intensity of A. lumbricoides, H nana, and T. trichiura in Sinaloa and Oaxaca. There was no association between malnutrition according to the nutritional indicators H/A (1o5.%), W/A (11.6%), and W/H (6.6%), and intestinal parasitic infections in school children from Sinaloa. However, school children with malnutrition according to the ratios W/A (57.8%) and W/H (32.6%) showed a higher prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections than uninfected children. The prevalence of malnutrition according to the ratios H/A and W/A was higher in school children from Oaxaca than in Sinaloa. The school children from both States are subjected to sub-optimal daily nutrient intakes. Although this shortage of nutrient intakes showed no association with the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections but was found to be associated with malnutrition. The financial status of the parents was found not to be an influencing factor in the prevalence of these infections in Sinaloa. In Oaxaca, the mothers contributed significantly with the family monthly income which was found to be negatively associated to the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections. The level of education of the parents in both States was found not to be associated with the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections and family monthly income. The uninfected school children from both States were living in better housing conditions than infected school children. An association was found between intestinal parasitic infections and frequency of respiratory infections, abdominal pain, and fever in the school children from Sinaloa, and abdominal pain, fever, diarrhoea, and allergies in Oaxaca. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Additional Information: Adviser: Phillips
Keywords: Epidemiology, Public health, Parasitology, Pharmaceutical sciences
Date of Award: 2001
Depositing User: Enlighten Team
Unique ID: glathesis:2001-72572
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 11 Jun 2019 11:06
Last Modified: 11 Jun 2019 11:06
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/72572

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