A feasibility study into the use of manned large one atmosphere underwater structures for the subsea production of oil and gas

Jones, Michael E. W (1981) A feasibility study into the use of manned large one atmosphere underwater structures for the subsea production of oil and gas. MSc(R) thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

This book is the result of a two-man year feasibility study into the use of manned large one atmosphere underwater structures for the subsea production of oil and gas from offshore deepwaters. The water depths considered range from 500 to 2000 metres, although the concept may have application in shallower or deeper depths once established. The technology investigated is also of value for other oceanic applications. The prospects for oil and gas deposits in deepwater are reviewed and technological aspects of deepwater production are assessed. Present, proposed and future offshore production systems are analysed in relation to water depth and the potential applications of the systems identified. The case for a detailed investigation of the manned underwater structure as an alternative concept is made. The problems of placing men and machinery in an enclosed one atmosphere structure on the seabed are investigated by assimilating technology in related fields. The technical feasibility of the concept is evaluated, operating systems and criteria are established and technological limitations identified. Systems analysis is performed on component systems and the interactions between subsystems indicated. Possible future subsea production configurations are postulated. Overall conclusions are drawn and recommendations for future research and development into the concept made.

Item Type: Thesis (MSc(R))
Qualification Level: Masters
Additional Information: Advisers: William Carson; B Scott
Keywords: Naval engineering, Petroleum engineering
Date of Award: 1981
Depositing User: Enlighten Team
Unique ID: glathesis:1981-72784
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 11 Jun 2019 11:06
Last Modified: 11 Jun 2019 11:06
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/72784

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