A shadow replaced by realities: the theme of temple in relation to Christology, Pneumatology and Ecclesiology in John's Gospel

Kasula, Suraj (2016) A shadow replaced by realities: the theme of temple in relation to Christology, Pneumatology and Ecclesiology in John's Gospel. MTh(R) thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

This dissertation seeks to examine the role of the temple in relation to Christology, Pneumatology, and Ecclesiology in John’s Gospel. The Jerusalem temple, which was believed to be the shadow of the true temple in the heavens, was destroyed in A.D. 70. John, writing his Gospel after its destruction, presented the person of Jesus as the new cultic center of Judaism, in whom the more transcendent reality of the heavenly temple was truly embodied. The eschatological Spirit would animate the new worship inaugurated in the messianic temple, so that the believers could worship the Father in spirit and in truth. The living water of the Spirit was expected to flow from the heavenly temple, which is the glorified Jesus, throughout the earth via the mission of the ecclesial community – a community now constituted as the sacred temple. In this way, the Fourth Gospel presents Israel’s temple and its cult replaced by new realities: the temple of Jesus’ body and the temple of the church. The former is incarnated as the temple, while the latter is transformed into the temple by the indwelling power of the Holy Spirit.

Item Type: Thesis (MTh(R))
Qualification Level: Masters
Keywords: Temple Christology, Temple Pnumatology, Temple Ecclesiology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BS The Bible
Colleges/Schools: College of Arts > School of Critical Studies > Theology and Religious Studies
Funder's Name: UNSPECIFIED
Supervisor's Name: MacLeod, Rev John
Date of Award: 2016
Depositing User: Mr Suraj Kasula
Unique ID: glathesis:2016-7343
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 01 Jun 2016 12:35
Last Modified: 28 Jun 2016 10:08
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/7343

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