The influence of staff communication style on service user response: An exploratory study

Andrews, Sarah (2008) The influence of staff communication style on service user response: An exploratory study. D Clin Psy thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

Background: Communication interventions for children with intellectual disabilities are increasingly being conducted using parent-focussed approaches. However, the effectiveness of such interventions in altering the communication style of parents remains somewhat unclear. This review aimed to investigate training based on the Interactive Model for mothers of children with intellectual disabilities. In addition, the effect of such training on the children's communicative and cognitive development was also considered. Method: Six databases were searched identifying a total of 32 articles. Twenty four studies were excluded, leaving a total of 8 studies for inclusion in the present review. All studies were screened using a structured rating scale. Results: Parent-focussed training was found to be generally delivered via three methods; group sessions, individual sessions, or a mixture of both. Whilst overall outcomes for the effect on mothers' interaction style were largely positive, several methodological issues were highlighted that may result in these findings being interpreted with caution. In addition, the gains made by children with intellectual disabilities were found to be more variable. Conclusions: Whilst initial results appear encouraging, there is a lack of well conducted studies in this area, with consistent methodological weaknesses identified. Moreover, future research must consider the individual characteristics of the parent and child, as well as the wider communication environment.

Item Type: Thesis (D Clin Psy)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Additional Information: Adviser: Andrew Johoda
Keywords: Clinical psychology, Communication
Date of Award: 2008
Depositing User: Enlighten Team
Unique ID: glathesis:2008-74040
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 23 Sep 2019 15:33
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2019 15:33
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/74040

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