From Servant of the Empire to Servant of God: Images of the Emperor From Constantine to the Macedonian Dynasty

Pampoulides, Andreas D. G (2000) From Servant of the Empire to Servant of God: Images of the Emperor From Constantine to the Macedonian Dynasty. MPhil(R) thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

This is an insight into the changing iconography of Byzantine art from the Constantinian age (AD 306-337) to the end of the Macedonian Dynasty in AD 1081. More specifically, it analyses the evolution and adaptation of the image of the emperor from as early as Ancient Greece, to Imperial Rome and finally Constantinople. The chronology starts with Alexander the Great, as the principle influence of the "warrior ruler" image. The aim is to analyse the nature of representation "types" in Roman Imperial art, which were, in turn, adopted by Early Christian image-makers in Constantinople. It is also an exploration into how Christian iconographical schemes utilised Hellenistic and Imperial Roman models to build its own forms of representation. This could be seen in numerous media throughout the arts of Constantinople. My chosen medium being the transformation of the emperor as a triumphant warrior, fighting for personal glory and the empire, to the pistos en christo basileus achieving glory through and for God.

Item Type: Thesis (MPhil(R))
Qualification Level: Masters
Additional Information: Adviser: Michael Michael
Keywords: Art history, Religious history
Date of Award: 2000
Depositing User: Enlighten Team
Unique ID: glathesis:2000-76077
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2019 09:15
Last Modified: 19 Dec 2019 09:15
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/76077

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