Studies on the Physiology of Blood Vessels

Ferguson, Iain Donn (1954) Studies on the Physiology of Blood Vessels. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF
Download (15MB) | Preview

Abstract

Blood vessels are capable of responding selectively to influences of both local and general origin. In the first chapter of this thesis, the influence of ascorbic acid is reported on vascular responses in the cornea of guinea-pigs following on a standard heat lesion. The time to reach maximum oedema formation and the incidence and intensity of the vascularization, as noted by direct observation, were significantly greater in a scorbutic group of guinea-pigs than in a control group. The influence of ascorbic acid on capillary permeability and on corneal vascularization is discussed. The ascorbic acid may act directly and locally at the site of healing in the cornea or indirectly by exerting an influence on the adrenal cortex or on its hormones. Blood vessels in isolated tissues continue to respond to stimuli of local origin. Thus, using a perfused isolated preparation it is possible to Study certain of the fundamental aspects of the functioning of the blood vessels in more detail. In Chapter 2, a relatively simple technique is given for the perfusion under controlled conditions of the blood vessels of the isolated ear of the rabbit. The necessary equipment, some of which had to be devised for the purpose, is described. Changes in weight of the isolated ear give the net outward filtration (oedema formation). By mathematical analysis, it has been found possible to derive the gross outward filtration. The behaviour of the blood vessels in the isolated preparation is gauged by the rate of inflow of the perfusion solution. Lowering the temperature of the perfusion solution from 38 to 16

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Keywords: Physiology, Medicine
Date of Award: 1954
Depositing User: Enlighten Team
Unique ID: glathesis:1954-79113
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 31 Mar 2020 09:09
Last Modified: 31 Mar 2020 09:09
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/79113

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year