MindMate: a single case experimental design study of a reminder system for people with dementia

McGoldrick, Claire (2017) MindMate: a single case experimental design study of a reminder system for people with dementia. D Clin Psy thesis, University of Glasgow.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF
Download (4MB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Prospective memory difficulties are commonly reported in people with dementia. The evidence supporting the use of prospective memory devices among the dementia population remains limited. MindMate is a recently developed smart device application that aims to support individuals with a diagnosis of dementia, improving self-management skills and quality of life. Aims: This study investigated the effectiveness and usability of the reminder tool on the MindMate application as a memory aid. Method: Three participants with a diagnosis of mild Alzheimer’s disease were recruited to this multiple baseline single case experimental design study. Partners of the participants recorded their performance on everyday tasks on weekly monitoring forms during a baseline phase (for between five and seven weeks) and during the intervention phase (five weeks) whilst using MindMate. Results: Two participants successfully used the app throughout the intervention weeks and gave positive usability ratings. Tau-U analysis showed a significant increase in memory performance between baseline and intervention phase (Tau-U = 1, 0.94, p<0.01). A third participant withdrew from the intervention phase following difficulties turning off the reminders and frustrations with the reminder alert sound. Conclusions: The use of the MindMate app was feasible for people with dementia in the community. It was effective compared to practice as usual, with participants reporting intentions to use in the future. Limitations and implications for future research are discussed.

Item Type: Thesis (D Clin Psy)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Keywords: Dementia, prospective memory, assistive device, reminder, app, activities of daily living.
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Colleges/Schools: College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Funder's Name: UNSPECIFIED
Supervisor's Name: Evans, Professor Jonathan
Date of Award: 2017
Depositing User: Dr Claire McGoldrick
Unique ID: glathesis:2017-8400
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 25 Sep 2017 13:09
Last Modified: 22 Dec 2017 11:26
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/8400

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item