Becoming Christian: redeeming the secular through the ordo of baptism

Carswell, W. John (2017) Becoming Christian: redeeming the secular through the ordo of baptism. DPT thesis, University of Glasgow.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF
Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

This thesis presents an argument for the development of a catechumenate for the Church of Scotland. It does so first by drawing attention to the wide discrepancy between the assumptions of the secular culture and those of the church, specifically the Church of Scotland, with a view to understanding the substantial differences in the beliefs of those baptised and the beliefs of the church. It argues that the church has yet to come to terms with this discrepancy and consequently has weakened its distinctive baptismal witness. Secondly, the thesis considers in depth the development and reception of two major studies on the subject of baptism conducted by the Church of Scotland in the last sixty years. It indicates that both remain largely unknown quantities within the church and have subsequently failed to provide practical guidance to the church in its practice of baptism. This thesis considers the experience and practice of adult baptism in contemporary Scotland and concludes with an extended argument justifying the need for a fully developed catechumenate.

Item Type: Thesis (DPT)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Keywords: Church of Scotland, baptism, catechumenate, catechesis, profession of faith, adult baptism, Tom Torrance, special commission, panel on doctrine, RCIA.
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BL Religion
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BV Practical Theology
Colleges/Schools: College of Arts > School of Critical Studies > Theology and Religious Studies
Supervisor's Name: Gay, Rev Doug
Date of Award: 2017
Depositing User: Rev. Walter John Carswell
Unique ID: glathesis:2017-8664
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 24 Jan 2018 15:53
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2018 13:12
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/8664

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item