Glasgow Theses Service

The 51st (Highland) Division during the First World War

French, Craig F. (2006) The 51st (Highland) Division during the First World War. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF
Download (24Mb) | Preview

Abstract

The aim of this thesis is to evaluate the 51st (Highland) division over the course of the First World War. Underpinning the study is an analysis of both change and continuity, at home and overseas, and the performance of the division as a fighting unit. The key themes identified for study have been training, esprit de corps, recruitment and reinforcement, and battle performance. Through the investigation of the key themes, other important characteristics have been analysed, such as command and control, organisation, and the level of centralisation in both the formation and in the wider Army. Key questions in the research apply to both divisional study and to wider academic understanding of the First World War. The thesis considers a number of themes that have been neglected by historians old and new, and brings into sharp focus some areas of research that may have produced inaccurate assumptions. In addition, a substantial range and quantity of primary sources have been utilised, many unexplored until now. The selection of the 51st (Highland) Division for study was based on a number of criteria. (Highland) Division experiences were both unique and not unique. In some areas it was a very individual formation, but in other areas or at particular times of the war it was not.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Subjects: D History General and Old World > D History (General) > D501 World War I
U Military Science > U Military Science (General)
Colleges/Schools: College of Arts > School of Humanities > History
Supervisor's Name: Strachan, Prof. H. and Mawdsley, Prof. E.
Date of Award: 2006
Depositing User: Geraldine Coyle
Unique ID: glathesis:2006-943
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 25 Aug 2009
Last Modified: 10 Dec 2012 13:28
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/943

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item