Mining genome data for endogenous viral elements and interferon stimulated genes: insights into host virus co-evolution

Dennis, Tristan Philip Wesley (2018) Mining genome data for endogenous viral elements and interferon stimulated genes: insights into host virus co-evolution. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Printed Thesis Information: https://eleanor.lib.gla.ac.uk/record=b3326682

Abstract

Paleovirology is the study of viruses over evolutionary timescales. Contemporary paleovirological analyses often rely on sequence data, derived from organism genome assemblies. These sequences are the germline inherited remnants of past viral infection, in the form of endogenous viral elements and the host immune genes that are evolving to combat viruses. Their study has found that viruses have exerted profound influences on host evolution, and highlighted the conflicts between viruses and host immunity. As genome sequencing technology cheapens, the accumulation of genome data increases, furthering the potential for paleovirological insights. However, data on ERVs, EVEs and antiviral gene evolution, are often not captured by automated annotation pipelines. As such, there is scope for investigations and tools that investigate the burgeoning bulk of genome data for virus and and antiviral gene sequence data in the search of paleovirological insight.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Keywords: Virus, endogenous, evolution, palaeovirology, mouse, circovirus, ISG, antiviral gene.
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH426 Genetics
Q Science > QR Microbiology > QR355 Virology
Colleges/Schools: College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Supervisor's Name: Wilson, Dr. Sam and Gifford, Dr. Robert
Date of Award: 2018
Depositing User: Tristan Dennis
Unique ID: glathesis:2018-30887
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 17 Oct 2018 14:50
Last Modified: 13 Nov 2018 08:41
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/30887
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