An Investigation of the Wear of Human Enamel and Dental Ceramics

Al-Hiyasat, Ahmad Saleh (1997) An Investigation of the Wear of Human Enamel and Dental Ceramics. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

There has been an increase in the use of ceramic restorative materials in modern dentistry. This is perhaps because of continuous patients' demands for dental restorations that simulate the appearance of their natural teeth. Although ceramic restorations provide good aesthetics, clinicians were always concerned about their abrasiveness against the natural dentition. The objective of this study was to investigate the wear of human enamel and dental ceramics using a wear machine that simulated the chewing cycle. The machine provided an impact action followed by sliding motion of a tooth specimen onto the surface of various restorative materials. Tooth specimens were prepared from the buccal cusp of extracted mandibular premolars, A total of four dental ceramic systems were tested in the study. These were Vitadur Alpha porcelain (aluminous porcelain), Vita Omega porcelain (bonded-to-metal porcelain), Duceram-LFC (hydrothermal low fusing ceramic); and Cerec Vita Mark II (machinable ceramic). Cast gold was also tested for comparison. Overall, throughout the study, a load of 40N was used with a cycle rate of 80 cycles per minute for a total of 25000 cycles. The amount of wear was determined by measuring the cusp height reduction of the tooth using a reflex microscope, and the depth of wear track on the surface of restorative materials using a Dektak 3 ST surface profile measuring system. After the wear test, specimens from both tooth and material were subjected to scanning electron microscopy for qualitative evaluation.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Additional Information: Adviser: William Saunders
Keywords: Dentistry
Date of Award: 1997
Depositing User: Enlighten Team
Unique ID: glathesis:1997-74585
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 13 Nov 2019 15:58
Last Modified: 13 Nov 2019 15:58
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/74585

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