Distribution of Oxytetracycline and Doxycycline to Normal and Diseased Lung Tissue from Several Species

Baxter, Peter (1993) Distribution of Oxytetracycline and Doxycycline to Normal and Diseased Lung Tissue from Several Species. Master of Veterinary Science thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

A High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for the measurement of oxytetracycline and doxycycline in plasma and lung tissue from various species. All animals were dosed by the intravenous (IV) route at 10mg/kg IV, except rats which were dosed by the intramuscular route (IM) at the same dose rate. Concentrations in normal rat lung were found to be significantly lower than plasma concentrations. Concentrations of oxytetracycline in normal sheep lung were found to be lower in both apical and diaphragmatic lobes compared to plasma, while doxycycline showed significantly higher lung concentrations in both areas compared to plasma. The concentration of oxytetracycline at 1 hour following IV administration in sheep diseased apical lung lobes was similar to plasma, which was significantly higher than diaphragmatic lung concentrations in the same animals. In cattle oxytetracycline concentration in diseased lung lobes was similar to normal lung, suggesting adequate drug penetration of the diseased tissue at both 1 and 2 hours. Oxytetracycline appears to distribute into both normal and diseased lungs of various species at slightly lower concentration than that found in plasma. Doxycycline appears to penetrate normal lungs of sheep at higher concentration than that found in plasma.

Item Type: Thesis (Master of Veterinary Science)
Qualification Level: Masters
Additional Information: Adviser: Jim Bogan
Keywords: Veterinary science
Date of Award: 1993
Depositing User: Enlighten Team
Unique ID: glathesis:1993-74813
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 27 Sep 2019 16:02
Last Modified: 27 Sep 2019 16:02
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/74813

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