Geomorphological Controls on the Sedimentation Patterns of, and Distribution of Anthropogenic Radionuclides In, Coastal Saltmarshes, South-West Scotland

Harvey, Mhairi Mikasi (2000) Geomorphological Controls on the Sedimentation Patterns of, and Distribution of Anthropogenic Radionuclides In, Coastal Saltmarshes, South-West Scotland. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

The saltmarshes within the Solway Firth are often regarded as a single unit, all experiencing similar physical conditions. This work demonstrates that they are different, each with a unique characteristic and quality. These qualities are identified and a new classification system for the Solway saltmarshes is proposed. With reference to these differences, the study investigates variations evident in sedimentation patterns utilising a number of methods which operate over different timescales. These methods are successfully integrated to provide a historical analysis of the dynamic nature of the Solway saltmarshes. The results indicate that the Solway marshes undergo rapid change and that this change is related largely to hydroperiod and vegetational influences. An integral part of this work is the utilisation of Sellafield derived contaminants as a tool to investigate sedimentation patterns. In addition to this, the distributions of the radionuclides are examined and interpreted with reference to the sedimentary status of the marshes under investigation. Many authors consider accreting saltmarshes to be long term stores for radioactive contaminants but this study demonstrates that physical and chemical dispersion of some radionuclide species indicates that the saltmarsh store is ephemeral.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Additional Information: Adviser: Jim Hansom
Keywords: Geomorphology, Sedimentary geology
Date of Award: 2000
Depositing User: Enlighten Team
Unique ID: glathesis:2000-76161
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 19 Nov 2019 16:33
Last Modified: 19 Nov 2019 16:33
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/76161

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