Reclamation of Saline Soil by Biological Methods

Abdullah, Fleyeh H (1985) Reclamation of Saline Soil by Biological Methods. MSc(R) thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

The main objective of this thesis was to carry out a study on the effect of soaking pea (Pisum Sativum L.) varieties, Meteor, Puget and Sprite, barley (Hordeum Vulgare L.) varieties, Gadmarker, Triumph, Golden Promise, Marko, Igri and Gerbel and Sugar beet (Beta Vulgare L.) varieties, Julia and Kelin Monseet with different inorganic salt solutions, extracts of Onion and Garlic, and phytohormones . Also included in the investigation was different lengths of dry periods after soaking. Forty nine experiments were carried out through chapters 2,3,4, and 5 in a growth room, some of them were grown for fourteen days. All experiments were carried out under saline conditions to investigate: A - The possibility of using economic crops to remove excessive salts from the soil as a biological approach, B - To assess which is more tolerant to salt, the germination or the growth stage. C - To assess whether there is any effect when using a soaking and dry period or not . D - To decide whether it is possible to increase the salt tolerance of field crops . In chapter one a brief account is given on salts and salinity problems. Firstly the source, formation, origin and type of salts found in Iraq is given. Secondly salinity problems and their affect on plant growth are discussed . Thirdly the general aim of agricultural reclamation and important methods of salt reclamation and their problems are discussed. Fourthly, reclamation of saline soil by biological methods and lastly the objectives of the thesis are discussed . In chapter two, ten experiments were carried out to study the effect of presoaking of barley varieties (Golden Promise, Marko and Gerbel) with calcium salts (CaCl2, CaBr2, Ca(CH3COO)2, Ca(NO3)2 and CaSO4) and different dry periods on germination and growth under saline conditions. Pretreatment with the calcium salts showed significant effects in increasing germination percentage of barley varieties in experiments 2,3,4 and 5 . The optimum results for calcium salts and dry period appeared in experiments 6, 7, and 8 and were as follows: A- For variety Golden Promise a 3% Ca(CH3COO)2 pretreatment with 2 and 3 weeks dry periods . B - For variety Marko a 3% CaCI2 with 2 and 3 weeks dry periods . C - For variety Gerbel a 3% Ca(CH3COO)2 with a 2 weeks dry period. Water alone used as a pretreatment, also showed a significant effect for all dry periods particularly with Golden Promise and Marko with 2 and 3 weeks dry periods . There are some developments in the case of barley varieties with regard to phenologic observations in the pot experiments (NO. 10) . Marko variety appeared to have higher germination and fresh weight than the other varieties. In addition it showed a response by absorbing more Na than the others. The work in chapter three was a continuation of the discoveries made in chapter two on the significant effect of calcium salts pretreatment and dry period on germination. Fourteen experiments were carried out on pea varieties Meteor, Puget and Sprite. 1% Ca(NO3)2 and 0.18% CaSO4 gave significant increases in germination percentage of the variety Meteor. Puget and Sprite, were responsive only to CaBr2 and CaSO4 at concentrations of 1% an 0.18% respectively. Also 0.14% CaSO4 gave a significant effect, but lower concentrations did not show any effect. All pea varieties did not show any response in terms of dry periods . In a growth experiment, pea varieties showed a slight response in terms of both phenological observations and mineral elemen contents. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

Item Type: Thesis (MSc(R))
Qualification Level: Masters
Keywords: Soil sciences
Date of Award: 1985
Depositing User: Enlighten Team
Unique ID: glathesis:1985-77331
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 14 Jan 2020 11:53
Last Modified: 14 Jan 2020 11:53
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/77331

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