Exploring the effectiveness of Errorless Learning and use of memory aids for people with dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment

Ferry, Katie (2021) Exploring the effectiveness of Errorless Learning and use of memory aids for people with dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment. D Clin Psy thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

Background: Preliminary evidence suggests that errorless learning may be an effective learning approach for people with memory impairments. This systematic review provides a narrative synthesis of the literature examining the effectiveness of errorless learning for people with dementia or Mild Cognitive Impairment.
Method: A systematic search was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO and CINAHL databases. Inclusion criteria were implemented and risk of bias assessed.
Results: From 431 records which were screened, 66 full texts were reviewed for eligibility. Of these, 23 papers met criteria and were included in the synthesis. Overall, there are ambiguous results as to whether errorless learning is more effective than trial and error learning for people with dementia or Mild Cognitive Impairment. However, the findings indicate that errorless learning is effective for word learning.
Discussion: There is evidence that reducing the likelihood of making errors during learning improves learning efficiency for people with dementia or MCI. However, evidence for the benefit of errorless learning is strongest for artificial tasks such as word list learning, whilst results for studies investigating learning of real-life tasks is more equivocal. Further research regarding which form of errorless learning method is most effective, for what tasks and over what time periods is required.

Item Type: Thesis (D Clin Psy)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Keywords: Dementia, Mild Cognitive Impairment, errorless learning.
Colleges/Schools: College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Supervisor's Name: Evans, Prof. Jonathan and McVicar, Dr. Sally
Date of Award: 2021
Depositing User: Theses Team
Unique ID: glathesis:2021-82488
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 07 Oct 2021 10:15
Last Modified: 07 Oct 2021 10:16
Thesis DOI: 10.5525/gla.thesis.82488
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/82488

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