Understanding recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis as a dynamic biofilm disease of Candida and Lactobacillus

McKloud, Emily (2021) Understanding recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis as a dynamic biofilm disease of Candida and Lactobacillus. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

Additionally, women with RVVC using hormonal contraceptives were found to have a more similar bacterial profile to healthy women, compared with women using other contraceptives. C. albicans biofilm reduction by Lactobacillus species was observed in an in vitro co-culture model. Further, RNA sequencing revealed an α-amino acid biosynthesis/breakdown pathway by which L. crispatus may out-compete C. albicans during VVC to re-establish vaginal health. Finally, bi-daily addition of L. crispatus was shown to reduce C. albicans composition within a complex biofilm model.
This study highlights the potential impact of Candida biofilm formation in RVVC and the importance of the consideration of biofilms for diagnosis and treatment. Additionally, it contributes to our current understanding of the vaginal microbiome during RVVC and antagonistic interactions between Candida and Lactobacillus. This work provides a foundation for future studies to further elucidate triggers for the development and recurrence of VVC/RVVC and the pathogenesis of the microbes involved. This and similar work will hopefully lead to the development of novel, more appropriate prevention and treatment options for persistent, azole resistant VVC.
Additionally, women with RVVC using hormonal contraceptives were found to have a more similar bacterial profile to healthy women, compared with women using other contraceptives. C. albicans biofilm reduction by Lactobacillus species was observed in an in vitro co-culture model. Further, RNA sequencing revealed an α-amino acid biosynthesis/breakdown pathway by which L. crispatus may out-compete C. albicans during VVC to re-establish vaginal health. Finally, bi-daily addition of L. crispatus was shown to reduce C. albicans composition within a complex biofilm model.
This study highlights the potential impact of Candida biofilm formation in RVVC and the importance of the consideration of biofilms for diagnosis and treatment. Additionally, it contributes to our current understanding of the vaginal microbiome during RVVC and antagonistic interactions between Candida and Lactobacillus. This work provides a foundation for future studies to further elucidate triggers for the development and recurrence of VVC/RVVC and the pathogenesis of the microbes involved. This and similar work will hopefully lead to the development of novel, more appropriate prevention and treatment options for persistent, azole resistant VVC.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Subjects: Q Science > QR Microbiology
R Medicine > RG Gynecology and obstetrics
Colleges/Schools: College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Supervisor's Name: Ramage, Professor Gordon and Riggio, Professor Marcello and Sherry, Dr. Leighann
Date of Award: 2021
Depositing User: Theses Team
Unique ID: glathesis:2021-82609
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 16 Dec 2021 16:26
Last Modified: 08 Apr 2022 17:02
Thesis DOI: 10.5525/gla.thesis.82609
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/82609
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