A sensitive device for SThM quantifiation

Umatova, Zarina (2018) A sensitive device for SThM quantifiation. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Printed Thesis Information: https://eleanor.lib.gla.ac.uk/record=b3327235

Abstract

This thesis describes an experimental study of the heat transport between the tip of a Scanning Thermal Microscope –Atomic Force Microscope (SThM-AFM) and nanofabricated sample.
SThM is one of the most flexible tools available for measuring thermal transport at the nanoscale. However, heat transfer between the probe and sample has a complicated nature as it depends on different parameters such as the nature of the surrounding gas (pressure, temperature, degree of humidity), and that of the mechanical contact between probe tip and sample (surface roughness and topography, mechanical properties of the tip surface and sample surface and the force applied). So understanding the heat flow between tip and sample requires careful study of all of these parameters. Thus quantification of tip and sample thermal contact is a key problem in the interpretation of SThM measurements.
In this work the fabrication of devices to quantify SThM tip and sample surface thermal resistance in one single contact are presented. The fabrication was performed using lithographic nanofabrication and MEMS technology. Thermally grown silicon dioxide was chosen as a membrane material for all devices due to its low thermal and electrical conductivity and ease of fabrication.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Keywords: SThM, MEMS, lithography.
Subjects: Q Science > QC Physics
Colleges/Schools: College of Science and Engineering > School of Engineering > Electronics and Nanoscale Engineering
Supervisor's Name: Weaver, Prof. JMR
Date of Award: 2018
Depositing User: Mrs ZU Umatova
Unique ID: glathesis:2018-30924
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 19 Oct 2018 09:59
Last Modified: 20 Nov 2018 11:36
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/30924

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