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A Deleuzian reading of spatial dependencies in the poetry of Mikolaj Sep Szarzynski

Rudzka, Izabela (2012) A Deleuzian reading of spatial dependencies in the poetry of Mikolaj Sep Szarzynski. MPhil(R) thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

In this study, I have selected two primary notions of the fold and two floors from Deleuze’s work ‘The Fold. Leibniz and the Baroque’ and have applied them to the 17th-century poet, Mikołaj Sęp Szarzyński. My methodological approach allows me to present Sęp Szarzyński’s poetry through the prism of various spatial relations and their mutual dependencies on many different levels. Space is crucial for the images which the poet employs in his works. In Part I I focus on the idea of movement presented by motifs of death and Fortune as well as rhetorical devices. In Part II I depict the image of the universe emerging from the analysed poems. In Part III I examine the topos of the labyrinth. In this respect Sęp Szarzyński’s sense of space is extraordinary. In his poetic world he created an alienated, abstract, colourless space, offering multiple dependencies between phenomena, concepts and ideas. Everything in this world seems to be in a state of perpetual aporia, a dynamic impasse which offers no simple answers or solutions leaving much space for infinite folds. Even the poetic form and syntax reflect this unusual rendering of space. The poetic space of Sęp Szarzyński is filled with folds which appear between phenomena and links them in human existence.

Item Type: Thesis (MPhil(R))
Qualification Level: Masters
Keywords: Baroque, space, fold, Baroque House, two floors, movement, death, Fortune, labyrinth
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PN Literature (General)
Colleges/Schools: College of Arts > School of Modern Languages and Cultures > Slavonic Studies
Supervisor's Name: Bates, Dr. John and Grossman, Dr. Elwira
Date of Award: 2012
Depositing User: Miss Izabela Rudzka
Unique ID: glathesis:2012-3276
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 30 Mar 2012
Last Modified: 10 Dec 2012 14:05
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/3276

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