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A sociophonetic study of the realization of word-final velar plosives by female pupils in a Glasgow high school

McCarthy, Owen (2012) A sociophonetic study of the realization of word-final velar plosives by female pupils in a Glasgow high school. MPhil(R) thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

This study analyses the realization of word-final /k/ in read and casual speech by female pupils in a Glasgow high school, specifically focusing on the realization of word final velar ejectives. The literature on ejectives in varieties of English is still at a very early stage and much of what we know of them is mainly anecdotal or comes from accepted, yet often unsubstantiated statements: they are more prominent word-finally, they usually do not follow voiceless sounds, they are found in varieties of Northern English. My research aims to identify the phonetic and linguistic factors that promote ejective use and to also gain a better understanding of who are using ejectives more and what social factors this depends on. In doing this I found that there is more going on than just independent factors at work. Instead the social factors of age and ethnicity seem to play crucial roles in ejective realization. Overall this study found some intriguing initial results showing that ejective realization of /k/ is now very common in these Glaswegian girls. It seems as if this represents a real-time change in Glasgow – though more data/study is needed to establish this.

Item Type: Thesis (MPhil(R))
Qualification Level: Masters
Keywords: word-final velar plosives, ejectives, Glasgow English, factors that promote ejective use, Glasgow sociophonetics
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PE English
P Language and Literature > P Philology. Linguistics
Colleges/Schools: College of Arts > School of Critical Studies > English Language
Supervisor's Name: Stuart-Smith, Dr. Jane
Date of Award: 2012
Depositing User: Mr Owen McCarthy
Unique ID: glathesis:2012-3331
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 09 May 2012
Last Modified: 10 Dec 2012 14:06
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/3331

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