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Covenanters and Conventicles in South West Scotland

Morton, David (2013) Covenanters and Conventicles in South West Scotland. MPhil(R) thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

The covenanters were a group of individuals from varied backgrounds who supported the National Covenant and carried out many activities to prevent the imposition of an episcopal church on the people of Scotland by James Vi, CharlesI and Charles II against the will of the Scottish people. The study reviews some of the literature which hs been written about the Covenanters and the services or conventicles which they held out in the fields. Their aim here was to continue their form of worship led by their own ministers.They believed that they served God and not the king. The study explores the area of Dumfries and Galloway and describes some of the monuments which were erected to commemorate the dedication of Covenanters who gave their lives. Emphasis is placed on conventicles and where these were held as well as accounts of interviews of present day Church of Scotland clergy who arrange and hold annual conventicles. The study concludes by trying to show the contribution the Covenanters made was an imoortant one and their sacrifice contributed to the establishment of the present day Church of Scotland as well as enabling individuals who live in the 21st century to worship in freedom.

Item Type: Thesis (MPhil(R))
Qualification Level: Masters
Keywords: Covenanters, Convnenticles, dedication of faith, bravery, unnecessary sufering at the hand of king's soldiers, monuments in Dumfries and Galloway
Subjects: D History General and Old World > DA Great Britain
Colleges/Schools: College of Arts > School of Humanities > History
Supervisor's Name: Cowan, Prof. Ted
Date of Award: 2013
Depositing User: Mr David R Morton
Unique ID: glathesis:2013-3767
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 07 Dec 2012
Last Modified: 10 Dec 2012 14:10
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/3767

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