Probing the large-scale homogeneity of the universe with galaxy redshift surveys

Sabiu, Cristiano Giovanni (2006) Probing the large-scale homogeneity of the universe with galaxy redshift surveys. MSc(R) thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

Modern cosmological observations clearly reveal that the universe contains a hierarchy of clustering. However, recent surveys show a transition to homogeneity on large scales. The exact scale at which this transition occurs is still a topic of much debate. There has been much work done in trying to characterise the galaxy distribution using multifractals. However, for a number of years the size, depth and accuracy of galaxy surveys was regarded as insufficient to give a definitive answer. One of the main problems which arises in a multifractal analysis is how to deal with observational selection effects: i.e. 'masks' in the survey region and a geometric boundary to the survey itself. In this thesis I will introduce a volume boundary correction which is rather similar to the approach developed by Pan and Coles in 2001, but which improves on their angular boundary correction in two important respects: firstly, our volume correction 'throws away' fewer galaxies close the boundary of a given data set and secondly it is computationally more efficient. After application of our volume correction, I will then show how the underlying generalised dimensions of a given point set can be computed. I will apply this procedure to calculate the generalised fractal dimensions of both simulated fractal point sets and mock galaxy surveys which mimic the properties of the recent IRAS PSCz catalogue.

Item Type: Thesis (MSc(R))
Qualification Level: Masters
Additional Information: Adviser: Martin Hendry
Keywords: Astronomy
Date of Award: 2006
Depositing User: Enlighten Team
Unique ID: glathesis:2006-74221
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 23 Sep 2019 15:33
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2019 15:33
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/74221

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