Surgical Treatment of Patellar Luxation in Dogs: Retrospective Findings After Wedge Recession Sulcoplasty and/or Tibial Tuberosity Transposition

De Rooster, Hilde (1994) Surgical Treatment of Patellar Luxation in Dogs: Retrospective Findings After Wedge Recession Sulcoplasty and/or Tibial Tuberosity Transposition. MVM(R) thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

The study opens with a review of literature on canine patellar luxation. Detailed reference is made to the occurrence, aetiology and pathogenesis, pathomechanics and classification of the range of patellar luxation in dogs. Diagnostic means are discussed. In the chapter on treatment, a survey is made of the majority of existing surgical and non surgical treatments available. Brief comments on prognosis conclude the search of existing literature. A clinical follow-up was carried out on fifty cases of medial patellar luxation which had been treated by recession wedge sulcoplasty (group A: 23), tibial tuberosity transposition (group B: 10) or a combination of both procedures (group C: 17) at Glasgow University Veterinary Hospital during the five-year period from June 1988 till December 1993. All post-operative information was gained via a client questionnaire. The hypothesis was that deepening the trochlear groove slows down the rate of recovery from surgery, as opposed to the more accepted practice of simply correcting the quadriceps axis by transposition of the tibial tuberosity. Ninety six per cent of dog owners across the three groups reported that they were pleased with the final outcome of the surgery performed. Only eight per cent of patients failed to become completely sound on the leg that was operated on. In a further ten per cent of cases, occasional stiffness was recorded. The availability of suitable dogs was limited, thus rendering group size relatively small. Another consequence of availability was that the distribution across the three groups was unavoidably unbalanced. These conditions combined to render the sample too small to reject the null hypothesis that no difference in outcome of surgery exists between the various groups of dogs.

Item Type: Thesis (MVM(R))
Qualification Level: Masters
Additional Information: Adviser: Andrew Miller
Keywords: Veterinary science
Date of Award: 1994
Depositing User: Enlighten Team
Unique ID: glathesis:1994-75814
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2019 09:15
Last Modified: 19 Dec 2019 09:15
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/75814

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