Sgoilean Chriosd 1811-1861: a study of the Edinburgh Society for the support of Gaelic schools

Harding, Albert William (1979) Sgoilean Chriosd 1811-1861: a study of the Edinburgh Society for the support of Gaelic schools. MLitt(R) thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Printed Thesis Information: https://eleanor.lib.gla.ac.uk/record=b1629002

Abstract

Chapter 1 Gaelic to the early 19thc: (Gaelic was never spoken in every part of Scotland; Indeed, it had to struggle for its very survival against Anglian and Norse. Fortunately, its similarity to Pictish and the emergence of Columba gave Gaelic an enormous cultural advantage. By the 11thc Gaelic was at its zenith - the language of court and church. Unfortunately, almost immediately after came a wave of change - feudal ideas, towns and trade. In response to these a Highland consciousness developed and by the 14thc the Lowland districts and the Crown regarded the highlands as a problem area. The information merely made things worse as did the various Jacobite revolts. By the end of the 18thc Gaelic had become a peasant speech and its people neglected and despised, almost semi-pagan in their beliefs. Chapter 2 The Roots of the society: Despite the fact that there were several thousand Gaels in Edinburgh the citizens were more interested in mission-work abroad. The Church of Scotland, dominated by the Moderates, had a suspicion of that growing band of Evangelicals, who sought to put fire into religion. The letters of a Welsh clergyman, the Rev. Mr. Thomas Charles of Bala, inspired a few individuals to consider the problem of the Highlands and Islands. John Campbell, the Haldanes, Christopher Anderson, Ebenezer Brown all had tentative views, but it required the energy and determination of an almost anonymous Edinburgh doctor, Charles Stuart of Dunearn, to set the Society in motion. Chapter 3 The Society at Work: Composed of men from all walks of life, of different backgrounds and denominations, the Society bound together their deep and passionate evangelical interests. Circulars, letters and appeals brought in masses of original statistics which revealed an appalling picture of ignorance and neglect. Rules and regulations, almost entirely based on those of the S.S.P.C.K. and the Rev. Mr. Charles, were speedily established. Chapter 4 Officials and Administration: Such a Society depended upon patronage and no fewer than three soveriegns gave their support. The most distinguished men and women of Scottish life served as Presidents, Vice-Presidents, Governors, Committee men, Secretaries, Treasurers, Clerks, Auditors and Life Members - in all 331 persons. Chapter 5 Finance The Society was always short of money and resorted to an amazing number of clever ways of raising cash - inviting legacies, lecturing tours, fetes, bazaars, sales of work. Indeed, their propaganda appeals were highly skilled as is shown by the wide measure of support, both at home and abroad. Auxil- iary Societies were formed at Glasgow, Duadee and Inverness, but these either went their separate ways or declined. The most powerful support came from the Edinburgh Ladies Association representing the flower of Scottish society. The basic weakness of the Society was their involvement in selling too many Bibles at too low a price. This led to almost annual crises. Chapter 6 Schools, Syllabus and Methods: A vast number of schools - some 740 were established in seven counties and no fewer than 29 islands. The process of obtaining a school, either through a minister or a petition, is examined, as are the standard of school buildings, heritor and conmunal involvement. The Teachers' Guide was a manual issued to teachers and the teaching methods used at the various levels are examined together with the system of rewards and punishments.

Item Type: Thesis (MLitt(R))
Qualification Level: Masters
Subjects: L Education > LC Special aspects of education
Colleges/Schools: College of Arts
Supervisor's Name: MacDonald, Dr. Kenneth
Date of Award: 1979
Depositing User: Mrs Marie Cairney
Unique ID: glathesis:1979-39032
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 20 Dec 2018 12:15
Last Modified: 20 Dec 2018 12:15
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/39032

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