Characterization of radiation-hard monolithic CMOS sensors

Argemí, Lluís Simón (2021) Characterization of radiation-hard monolithic CMOS sensors. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

The work presented in this thesis consists of the characterisation of monolithic CMOS sensors targeting the requirements of the outer-most layer of the ATLAS Inner Tracker after the High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. Three detectors are investigated: an investigator chip and two large scale demonstrators (MALTA and mini-MALTA). The investigator chip is designed in the standard TowerJazz 180 nm technology and served as a tool to investigate the geometric parameters that affect the pixel capacitance. The MALTA chip is designed in the modified TowerJazz 180 nm technology and implements a novel asynchronous readout to minimise power consumption. The sensor is irradiated with X-rays up to 1.25 MRad to test the resistance of the front-end circuit to ionising radiation effects. The mini-MALTA chip is designed following the results obtained on MALTA and implements an improved front-end and pixel layout to enhance the radiation hardness of MALTA. A similar X-ray irradiation campaign is done for this chip showing good radiation hardness after 80 MRad of TID. Aside from the characterisation work, FPGA-based readouts for the MALTA and mini-MALTA chips were developed in collaboration with the CMOS development group at CERN.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Subjects: Q Science > QB Astronomy
Q Science > QC Physics
Colleges/Schools: College of Science and Engineering > School of Physics and Astronomy
Funder's Name: European Commission (EC)
Supervisor's Name: Buttar, Professor Craig and Bates, Dr. Richard
Date of Award: 2021
Depositing User: Theses Team
Unique ID: glathesis:2021-82418
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 31 Aug 2021 15:19
Last Modified: 31 Aug 2021 15:19
Thesis DOI: 10.5525/gla.thesis.82418
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/82418

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