Cantus, songs and fancies: context, influence and importance

Cooper, Kathryn Lavinia (2003) Cantus, songs and fancies: context, influence and importance. MMus(R) thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Printed Thesis Information: https://eleanor.lib.gla.ac.uk/record=b2154438

Abstract

John Forbes' Cantus, Songs and Fancies was the first book of secular music to be printed in Scotland. Much of the book's content derives from English publications with few truly Scottish songs. The present study is concerned with the context and sources of the book with the aim of ascertaining what relevance it holds in the musical history of Scotland. The first two chapters of the study are concerned with the context and current situation of the books. There are several useful information resources detailing the history of the book and Aberdeen and one of the aims of the work was to collate this data. All known copies were identified (as far as possible) as part study. This involved visiting as many of the libraries holding copies as possible and also searching library catalogues, sales catalogues, books and bibliographical publications. The second two chapters are concerned with the source and influences of CSF. This involved comparing many manuscripts to the CSF, utilising the original manuscripts, microfilms and photocopies. The final aspect investigated the possible purposes of gathering manuscript collections of songs. This section also compares the habit to that of keeping commonplace books, a widespread practice during the seventeenth century.

Item Type: Thesis (MMus(R))
Qualification Level: Masters
Subjects: M Music and Books on Music > M Music
M Music and Books on Music > ML Literature of music
Colleges/Schools: College of Arts > School of Culture and Creative Arts > Music
Supervisor's Name: Edwards, Dr. Warwick
Date of Award: 2003
Depositing User: Mrs Marie Cairney
Unique ID: glathesis:2003-81724
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 15 Oct 2020 12:33
Last Modified: 15 Oct 2020 12:34
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/81724

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