Understanding decentralisation: the case of Chile

Velásquez-Forte, Flavia (2013) Understanding decentralisation: the case of Chile. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow.

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Abstract

This research is about administrative and political decentralisation processes, especially the efforts made by the Chilean state towards regional decentralisation. Thus the analysis is focused on two reforms: the creation of the Division of Planning and Development within the regional government and the direct election of regional councillors, which aims to reorganise the regional governments. Qualitative research and instrumental case study approach were used in order to develop this research. The research addresses three main topics: the understanding of decentralisation that key actors have, so that the agency according to that understanding; the scopes of the two reforms so far; and the relationship between the central state and the regions. Thus, the main findings are that Chilean decentralisation has been implemented with excessive caution and gradualism and that informal relations between key actors are essential in the creation of collaborative spaces. The research also discusses whether decentralisation is a process or a sequence of isolated events in Chile. Finally, the tension between administrative and political decentralisation is analysed in order to have a better understanding of both processes.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Qualification Level: Doctoral
Keywords: decentralisation, power, state.
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > G Geography (General)
J Political Science > JA Political science (General)
J Political Science > JL Political institutions (America except United States)
Colleges/Schools: College of Science and Engineering > School of Geographical and Earth Sciences > Geography
Funder's Name: UNSPECIFIED
Supervisor's Name: Lowder, Dr. Stella and MacKinnon, Professor Daniel
Date of Award: 2013
Depositing User: Dr. Flavia Velásquez-Forte
Unique ID: glathesis:2013-5277
Copyright: Copyright of this thesis is held by the author.
Date Deposited: 12 Jun 2014 14:18
Last Modified: 12 Jul 2017 12:09
URI: http://theses.gla.ac.uk/id/eprint/5277

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